"Recent Work From Anthology Film Archives"

United States of America (1975)
December 3, 2012 - 7:30 pm
In-person: 
John Klacsmann, Anthology Film Archives

Archivist John Klacsmann will present a program of recent preservations undertaken by Anthology Film Archives including Money, a radically-composed, rapid-fire time capsule of Lower Manhattan and United States, a conceptual bicentennial film dealing with spatial and temporal relationships between two travelers, their car, and the geographic, political, and social changes from New York to Los Angeles. In addition to the other works listed, Klacsmann will show a sampling of newly digitized videos and a few reels from the “Unessential Cinema” collection of works gathered from deceased laboratories, bereaved widows and trash dumpsters.

 Approx. TRT: 60 min. 

Money (1985)

Directed by Henry Hills

A radically-composed time capsule, a rapid-fire portrait of the innovative ‘downtown’ Lower Manhattan community of poets, musicians, dancers, and personalities active in the early-to-mid-1980s. As much a sound work as it is a film, Money features John Zorn, Christian Marclay, Fred Frith, Arto Lindsay, Abigail Child, Charles Bernstein, and an extraordinary cast of luminaries.

35mm, b/w, 15 min. 

Chewing (1980)

Directed by Madeleine Gekiere

A delightful structuralist study of the act of eating an apple.

16mm, color, 6 min. 

Letter to D.H. in Paris (1967)

Directed by David Brooks

An influential figure within the NYC experimental film community of the mid-1960s, David Brooks died tragically young leaving behind only a handful of works. This piece is described by the maker as “Stoned people, music, movement, fields.”

16mm, color, 4 min. 

Six Windows (1979)

Directed by Marjorie Keller

“A pan and a dissolve make a window of a wall on film. A portrait of the filmmaker in a luminous space, synthetically rendered via positive and negative overlays. ... I lived in some rooms by the sea and watched the inside and the view as well as the window panes that divided and joined them. I was often lost in thought. The birds would come and make a racket, reminding me I shared that space and sky with them. The film is a moody record of that place and my peace of mind.”

16mm, color, silent, 7 min. 

The United States of America (1975)

Directed by Bette Gordon, James Benning

A true masterpiece of 70s cinema, more remarkable today than ever before. A conceptual bicentennial film dealing with spatial and temporal relationships between two travelers, their car, and the geographic, political, and social changes from New York to Los Angeles. The space within each frame is at the same time continuous and elliptical.

16mm, color, 27 min.